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Coursework

The Office of Early College Programs will work closely with every student to ensure that appropriate coursework is taken to help fulfill high school graduation requirements.

To encourage a community based learning environment, in the Fall, all CUSP students will be enrolled in the same section of First Year Success Seminar (FY100  – 2 credits) and a 1 credit Major & Career Exploration course (FY215 - 1 credit). CUSP students will also take our Philosophy of Liberal Arts course (PHIL 102  – 3 credits) which fulfills two general education requirements (Critical Thinking and Philosophical Inquiry) and, more importantly, provides students with an introduction to the various humanities disciplines.

In the spring, CUSP students will take our Creative Problem Solving course which is intended to be an introduction to the topic of creativity and problem engagement. Multi-modal assignments foster convergent and divergent thinking through investigation – and practice – within a variety of scientific and arts contexts.

First Year Template

Fall Semester Spring Semester
FY100 – 2 credits
First Year Success Seminar
Creative Problem Solving – 3 credits
(INTD 195) Same section but open to others
FY215 – 1 credit
Major & Career Exploration
PHIL 102 (FC/PI) – 3 credits
Philosophy of Liberal Arts
   

Additional coursework will vary based on the student’s previous college coursework completed and the courses needed to fulfill graduation requirements.

Sample Schedule

Fall Semester Spring Semester

FY100 – 2 credits
CUSP Only Section

Creative Problem Solving – 3 credits
(INTD 195) All in same section but open to others

FY215 – 1 credit
Major & Career Exploration

PHIL 102 (FC/PI) – 3 credits
All in same section but open to other students

COMP 101 (FW) – 4 credits
HS & GenEd Requirement

LITR 100 (FC) – 4 credits
HS & GenEd Requirement

ECON 110 (SA) – 3 credits
HS Requirement

FS - Student Choice
GenEd Requirement

POLS 110 (SA) – 4 credits
HS & GenEd Requirement

FM - Student Choice
GenEd Requirement

PE -  Student Choice – 1 credit
HS & GenEd Requirement

Elective – 3 or 4 credits
Student Choice

15 - 18 credits
Little flexibility to explore major-specific courses

Full load+

*Depending on students’ previous coursework, in most cases it may not be possible (and certainly would not be recommended) for students to fit all requirements for a diploma in the first semester. In addition, some schools may not issue diplomas mid-year.

FY 100 -- @First Year Success Seminar (2). The purpose of the First Year Success Seminar (FYSS) is to introduce new students to an open and purposeful learning environment, and to help them develop the habits and rewards of good scholarship. The course will help students connect with the college, through meaningful contact with faculty, staff and other students. It will inform students about the services available to them and help students make a successful transition to the social and academic life at the college.

FY 215 - @CAREER DEVELOPMENT (1) - This course is designed to assist students in the exploration of majors and careers. It will focus on methods to design and implement long and short-term career goals and maximize career readiness and success. The course will include and utilize career development theory to aid students in understanding their own career exploration and planning processes. Students will be exposed to a variety of assessments, activities, and discussion topics. Sessions will focus on career and life management skills to prepare students to make sound decisions about their futures.

PHIL 102 -- Philosophy of the Liberal Arts (3) This course examines arguments for and against the traditional humanities disciplines. Defenders of the humanities argue that studying philosophy, art, literature, culture and history can improve students' abilities to think critically about moral issues, interact fruitfully with people from other cultures, fulfill their obligations as citizens and live meaningful and fulfilling lives. In this class we will critically examine these claims. Understanding these arguments will require careful engagement with a number of fundamental philosophical questions regarding the nature of morality. The relationship between values and culture, the possibility of objective judgments in aesthetics and ethics, and the standards by which to judge whether one's life is or is not meaningful. We will explore these questions through careful reading of classic and contemporary philosophical work.